2015 Public Art Installations

Photo by Etienne Frossard

Jeppe Hein: Please Touch the Art

Mirror Labyrinth. ©Etienne Frossard

Danish artist Jeppe Hein’s parkwide installation, Please Touch the Art, presented by Public Art Fund, featured playful sculptures designed specifically for public interaction. Jeppe, now based in Berlin and Copenhagen, studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Art and the Stadelschule in Frankfurt. His works have appeared all over the world. This exhibition included three distinct bodies of work: a large Mirror Labyrinth, featuring evenly-spaced vertical elements of varying heights made from mirror-polished stainless steel that multiply the surrounding landscape; 16 Modified Social Benches that upend the idea of a traditional park bench with their unconventional angled, curved, twisted, and bent forms; and Appearing Rooms, whose “rooms,” formed from jets of water, appeared and disappeared throughout the day. Please Touch the Art was on view from May 2015 to March 2016.

The Fence

The Fence

THE FENCE is an annual collaboration between United Photo Industries, Photo District News (PDN), Brooklyn Bridge Park, the Flash Forward Festival, and Atlanta Celebrates Photography (ACP) who join forces each year to curate and produce this unique site-specific exhibition aimed at fostering conversations and exploring new thematic directions in photography. Armed with the task of curating such a large, public exhibition, UPI assemble a jury of more than 30 highly-respected photography professionals from around the world, who offer their time, energy and years of experience to curate this monumental outdoor exhibition – presenting the work of 40 talented photographers from around the world to a combined audience of over 1.5 million visitors each summer.

At Home in the Park

At Home in the Park

A series of original murals painted by students of the Rush Philanthropic Arts Foundation (RPAF), At Home in the Park was the first of 99 Plymouth’s rotating local art installations. Inspired by the work of Mary Temple, the RPAF murals appeared as shadows cast through adjacent windows. Students created the murals by taking action-based photos throughout the park and selecting the most compelling to depict. Outlines of the photographs were drawn with marker on acetate, projected, and sketched onto the walls in larger scale. Working in groups, students painted in great detail to achieve the expression of outdoor exuberance from an indoor perspective.

Come Say Hey

Come Say Hey

For her multimedia project, Come Say Hey, artist Sarah Conarro portrayed a fictional advice consultant known as “Fiora Foryourinformation” at a mobile pop up stand in various locations around the park, where she collected advice from visitors on any and every topic. Written advice and recorded statements from the stand were incorporated in an evolving multimedia installation at 99 Plymouth with collaborators John Crowe and Elizabeth Colestock Collins. Crowe explored the park’s landscape, chronicling the park’s seasonal changes and activities on 16mm film. Colestock Collins used elements of time-as-design as she interpreted the experience into a new, abstract, map-based animation piece. Come Say Hey was on display September through November 2015 in 99 Plymouth’s Community Room.

The Wonder Under

The Wonder Under

The Wonder Under, by Brooklyn-based artist Matthew Jensen, explored the place histories of public landscapes in New York City. The installation at 99 Plymouth featured meticulously cut photographs of objects collected from the surrounding parkland displayed in two-dimensional curiosity cabinets that reference museum vitrines. The objects, all found in plain sight, revealed how the past and present intertwine in this landscape. Historical artifacts like 19th century porcelain, a half-cent from 1850, and flint and obsidian spear points, mixed with contemporary castoffs of plastic, foam, metal and glass. Countless pieces of coal and blast furnace slag served as reminders that residue from the industrial revolution remains part of our environment. The Wonder Under was on view from December 2015 to March 2016.

Near the end of installation, Jensen led a low tide collection walk during which participants made their own found object collections, similar to how Jensen created The Wonder Under. Jensen photographed the objects and assembled an art book, viewable here. BBP Horticulture Supervisor Rashid Poulson accompanied the walk and spoke about the Park’s horticulture and ecosystems, which can be seen represented in the book.